11

It depends on how often you use your printer, meaning how many particles does your printer emit for time-unit. If you print nonstop with 5 printers then it's a different situation, opposite to one print per week. Best material for passive filtering is carbon foam. It has the ability to capture chemical fumes. See this filter comparison. Having an enclosure ...


11

My residential materials expert referred me to these links (3D Printing Fume Extraction Solutions, and ABS 3d Printer Nanoparticle and Chemical Exhaust Air Filter) and thinks that you're pretty much on track with the idea of using activated carbon. We both primarily print with ABS with my Replicator Dual and what's worked enough for me (in the past 5 years) ...


6

Sort of related, see the answers to: Commercially available 3D printer fume and UFP extractor, and; What are the best air filtration options for enclosures? Addressing your points in turn: Ventilation - Probably not, as you want to keep the print warm. However, when printing with filaments where well ventilated conditions are recommended1, to prevent the ...


6

I have looked into this a lot. Especially when I had a phd chem engineer girlfriend who kept talking about how the fumes might give me cancer.. Frankly the system you need just costs too much. Lab equipment can run 20k easily. Not to mention the noise. What you really need is a backyard shed, but as one who lives where it snows I understand that is rarely a ...


5

I was very concerned about this issue when I bought my own 3d printer, so I decided to design fumes extraction solution for this. It is tailored only for my Zortrax M200 but I hope that it is good example of how to solve this problem with limited budget. http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1158639


3

The short answer is: yes, it is always a good idea to print in a well-ventilated area. The longer answer can be articulated as follows: Definition of "fumes" "Fumes" is a fuzzy word that from a chemical/physical perspective includes at least three different things: Vapour - the gas phase of a substance Aerosol - a airborne suspension of ...


3

I designed this self-printable filter enclosure. Rather than vent any air outside the printer enclosure, this will recirculate the air within, constantly running the air through the filter while at the same time conserving the heat needed for ABS prints. It's simple, and you can employ more than one of these or, using my design files, extend the size of ...


3

Make sure and pay attention to safety. I have heard of more than one report of a RepRap printer going up in flames. On example of that is if the thermistor fails, or gets disconnected, and the controller puts the bed, or extruder, into thermal runaway. Make you make the enclosure out of a non-combustible material, so you don't add any fuel to the fire.


2

For ABS, if you are using an air filter, you do NOT want ventilation, because ABS prints are better quality if the ambient temperature is up at 50°C (or even warmer), and ventilation will reduce your chamber temperature. Whatever has been helping for noise cancelling now should work in the future.


2

When printing PLA you do not require an enclosure! PLA does not shrink as much as e.g. ABS. When printing PLA you should definitely ventilate your casing. I guess your steppers are also located in the enclosure, so you should be careful of not overheating the enclosure. Not only the steppers, but also think of the cold end cooling, too much heat in the ...


2

For the most part, a consumer 3D Printer will only need proper ventilation when using potentially harmful materials such as ABS. (See duplicate question). If you're printing with primarily PLA, then you don't need to worry. I print mostly with ABS and keep my machine close to a window and I haven't experienced any issues.


1

Your environmental conditions will preclude finding a machine suitable for your purposes in the budget specified. Humidity is a problem with many material types, especially nylon, but also with PLA and ABS, the more common filaments used in 3D printing. You can likely reject PLA for your mechanical needs, as it is brittle and weak compared to ABS. PLA ...


1

Yes... The issue with all 3d printing materials. Not just ABS, but worse with ABS is the fine air particulate and Ultra fine it creates during the 3d printing process. PLA is considered safer than ABS. But I fear people will use this as justification, it is like saying I only smoke one cig a day instead of two so I am safe and healthy. No it really should be ...


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