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11

There are several things you could try without spending much but even PLA will warp on an unheated bed. I had a Legacy Kossel that I switched to an acrylic bed and had many issues with warping and prints pulling off the bed. Some cheap things to try would be... Adding a brim to the print. Blue painters tape on the acrylic, remove the other material if ...


9

The first thing to understand is what causes warping. Warping is caused by the thermal contraction of the plastic when it cools down. Simplifying things a fair bit, you can visualise the process like this: hot, expanded plastic gets deposited on cooler, shrunk layers, when the hot plastic cools down, it shrinks and pulls the upper part of the layer below ...


7

I am an official Wanhao Distributor By experience I can recommend you to print with this settings: Extruder 230 °C Heated Bed 65 °C Have a glass surface Use hairspray over the glass Continue to enclose the printer or at least put it where there is almost no wind Print at 45 mm/s Note that this settings vary a lot depending on humidity and other factors ...


6

I actually find it's not needed for PLA. I generally have it heated to 40 °C and use blue painters tape along with some hairspray (I prefer Tresemme as it smells gorgeous). I've experimented with a glass bed, and Buildtak but I find blue painters tape is the key. I overlap the blue tape ends to the bed so it sticks, then spray the hairspray onto ...


5

For ABS it will warp unless you build a heat chamber. That said the tricks to reduce warping come down to: Material, i.e. PLA is less likely to warp; Use a fan, it helps so much; Make sure you have temps calibrated well - Too hot is more warp; Use a raft. The Makerbot uses a raft and no heated bed; Make sure the room is not drafty. Having it by the ...


5

Heating the bed helps me, even with PLA. I print with a 60 °C bed. The bed is 3/8" 6061 alloy aluminum, sanded with 600 grit sandpaper, coated with Elmer's purple glue stick, and dried. The brim will help. You might make the brim thicker than one layer (like 2-3 layers). If you look at the bottom of your print, are there large gaps where the PLA ...


5

Options to check (in order of probability of occurenece and success): Z-calibration Maybe you should perform calibration again. It's possible that nozzle is now too close which causes the filament is spread on the heatbed, which causes that the bottom surface is "too flat". It means all separate filament tracks are spilled and they create "glass flat" ...


5

One hundred percent infill is not necessarily stronger than lower values. By having such a high infill figure, the forces on the model as it cools are magnified and not in a particularly good manner. Consider that you could use twenty to thirty percent infill to get the strength you require for this application, saving filament and time for the print. You'...


5

The up-curling of overhangs is frequently seen when printing PLA or PETG when the just deposited layer hasn't been cooled enough. The residual heat will allow the curling as the plastic has not been fully set (above the so called glass temperature) because of insufficient part cooling. Knowing that ABS doesn't need much cooling (to improve the inter-layer ...


4

Without more information we cannot address what is causing your edges to turn up. This can depend on the model being printed, the process, the material, the bed, and the method used to bond it to the bed. As far as the initial question, a fan will most certainly ensure uneven cooling. The middle of the print is, and will remain, the warmest. If you want ...


4

I would do as fred_dot_u initially suggested, by increasing the bed temp (or using a hair dryer) to heat the BuildTak. Then, use a small fan to quickly cool the platform (or at least quicker than room temperature). An ice pack on the build plate/part could also work. This drastic fluctuation between the build platform (or BuildTak) and the part should make ...


4

I have only experienced PLA "super sticking" if the print bed is allowed to cool too much. I would suggest running a mild preheat to your bed when you find a print has stuck and the bed is cool. (What you set the temp to for the preheat would depend on the filament in question but start low and work up and you may find a sweet spot/release point for your ...


4

Heated beds can help, but you have to be careful using too much heat. If you go above the glass transition temperature (about 60 °C for PLA), the stresses of the upper layers cooling will warp the bottom, because above the glass transition temperature, the PLA can deform. For example, I was making very tall and skinny parts, a recipe for warping. ...


4

Putting a large brim on it can help, I've seen people rescue prints with larger brims by literally adding weights to the brim around the areas that are peeling up. I've done it by taping brim edges down carefully as the print goes.


4

Cr-10 S Pro has an eco mode make sure it's not turned on because this will turn your bed off after the first few layers have printed.


4

If you start a print there is an "Adjust" button, that will take you to a screen where there is an option "Economic". It that is left on it will turn off the bed heater during the print.


4

Pla is flexible and can be shaped at temperatures as low as 50 deg C. To prevent deforming your prints in removing them, you should wait for the bed to reach room temperature. This takes about 5 minutes after a print ended.


4

After watching it countless times, I found out that it was the magnetic mat on the bed that has worn out. It no longer adheres to the bed completely flat and some of the texture was worn down more than in other areas. It wasn't visually detectable - I found it by checking the nozzle height with various feeler gauges in multiple random locations.


4

Warping is caused by the plastic shrinking as it cools and inadequate bed adhesion is usually the what lets it warp. Either cleaning your print surface very thoroughly with rubbing alcohol or using something like a glue stick on your print bed will mitigate that warping enough that you won't suffer problems with your print. Printing too hot can also be a ...


4

What's causing this warping/lifting? The warping and lifting is caused by insufficient adhesion. This can be caused by an incorrect first layer (it is difficult to see the raft, but generally, rafts have no solid bottom, so less adhesion as there is less material), e.g. not sufficiently squished to the plate. Note that a raft is absolutely unnecessary for ...


3

This is fundamentally a heat transfer problem. As a large print is being made, it is very thin. Thin things cool off quickly, especially when no new hot material is being placed on top in the meantime. A heated bed will only help for a time, depending on the print size, before it starts to actually contribute to warping due to rapidly cooling upper layers ...


3

If you can, set your slicer to do honeycomb fill. Depending on the weight requirement choose maybe 10% - 20% fill. That ought to do the trick. It won't be solid, but it should be strong enough. What are you going to put on the platform?


3

It really depends on your formulation. 70 °C would be on the higher end. I think I do between 70 °C - 75 °C. Not any higher. Add a glue from a glue stick to help with keeping it on the bed. Use a raft to reduce the issue as well. A fan is the number one thing you can do. The last solution is to build a heat enclosure. They are ...


3

Consider using a different material. Since you're on a replicator 2 you're probably not printing with ABS (which would be a terrible choice for a large, flat model) but probably with PLA. Perhaps you could try printing with PET(G) instead, which tends to warp even less. You could try modifying your model a little. If you include several grooves in the bottom ...


3

I can't address polycarbonate specifically, but can provide a general overview of the higher temperature filament considerations. Printing on a raft means that the adhesion temperature of the filament is accomplished. This temperature is the factor to be considered if you are thinking of dropping the printing temperature. If you drop below recommended ...


3

No, this is not common behavior, and yes this can cause your prints to warp or detach from the build plate. The question is whether you instructed this (by accident) or not (e.g. it can be a result from slicing or some economy mode of the printer). This should be clear if you look into the G-code file that you print. The typical commands that concern bed ...


3

Cura has an additional setting that you can make visible called "Lift Head". My recommendation is that you do the following: Set your minimum print speed to something actually reasonable like 30mm/s or higher. Printing too slowly negates the following two settings and is not beneficial to printing small features. Set your minimum layer time to something ...


3

While I tried a lot of things to solve this, including tuning temperature, fan, speed, etc., ultimately the single biggest factor that causes or prevents it is the state of Cura's Outer Before Inner Walls (outer_inset_first) option. With outer walls first, I don't have the problem at all. With the default (inner walls first), I have it to varying degrees ...


3

PLA doesn't usually have water absorption issues. It usually prints just fine ... Maker's Muse did a video using 7yo PLA filament (IIRC) which had been stored in the open. Printed without issues. Not saying all PLA's are going to work as well, but I don't think it's a place I'd be looking first for an issue. Moisture in the filaments usually exhibits itself ...


2

I use 3DLAC from Reprapworld on a heated bed. People I meet once a month during our 3D Printer meets use this stuff on non-heated beds. I suspect it is just hairspray, but for me it did miracles. Especially printing large objects that go all the way up to the edge.


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