Hot answers tagged

9

In effect, the ground (from mains) does not need to be connected to the relay, the relay interrupts the "hot" or "neutral" (preferably the "hot", but that is not possible for all plugs, e.g. some European plugs can be inserted 180° turned into the sockets). You connect one of the interrupted wires to the COM, the other interrupted wire (that goes to the ...


7

By connecting to the D9 output header (see RAMPS 1.4 shield schematic below) you only have 2 wires that represent a scheduled load and ground. You actually need to connect the positive (red) lead to the power supply 12 V and the negative (black) lead to the ground. The third wire (usually a different color) needs to be connected to the actual D9 in your ...


6

You might be able to use one of the connectors (Deans Ultra, EC3, XT-60/30, Bullet) that are normally used for RC models. They're made for very high currents. The XT60 connectors depicted below are rated for 60A continuous (well above what you'd need for any heated bed); their smaller XT30 cousins are good for 30A but less commonly available. (Photo by Mark ...


6

You need to take a step back and think about what you are doing. From what I read there you are connecting the neutral to the low voltage. You should definitely not mix connections between your high and low voltage side. I think you are lucky to not have broken more things than the logic board. I quickly drafted this to show the idea. The relay provides ...


5

You need a 2.54 mm pitch (similar pitch to Dupont) female IDC (insulation displacement connectors on a ribbon cable) connector of 2x5P (pins) for the header connectors that have a notch. (for comparison, note that e.g. RAMPS 1.4 has 2x5p dupont headers on the shield for the AUX headers, not the notch type headers) These connectors are usually crimped ...


5

There are very many combinations that will work. A bipolar stepper has 2 coils. Swapping the coils, or reversing the polarity of a coil, will simply cause the stepper to rotate in the opposite direction. On RAMPS, one coil should connect to 1A and 1B, whereas the other coil should connect to 2A and 2B. On the stepper, one coil is A+ and A-, the other coil ...


5

It is okay to just use bare wires in the type of screw connector found on your power supply. They're designed for it; they have a little plate under the screw that prevents the wires from being frayed by the screw. If you want neater wire termination, you should use one of the spade type ones. Pick the smallest size that fits your wires. PC power cords are ...


4

Very basically speaking, electricity works like this: There's some source that delivers a certain voltage. You have a device that operates at a certain voltage. The device voltage and supply voltage should always match. No, don't put that 120V US device in a 230V outlet in Europe. The device does something. By doing something it draws current. Most devices ...


4

TL;DR To answer your question how (by assuming you have a 4 pins PINDA v2 sensor) to connect the sensor to your board, you have 2 options: Do not connect the white wire and treat the sensor as you would use a normal endstop switch (blue is ground, brown is +5 V, black is signal), Connect the 4 wires (use a splitter cable to split out into a 3 and 1 pin ...


4

I agree with Tom's answer about RC connectors. Another good connector option worth considering is Anderson Powerpoles. They're "modular" so you can use them to assemble connectors with multiple wires. They crimp instead of solder (I really recommend the special crimping tool if you plan to use these regularly) They're more expensive No male/female, you use ...


3

Welcome to 3d Printing! as this is a first day of the printer there could be a list of items... First thing first: disconnect all peripherals, so we can test mainboard. Before connecting PSU we can connect mainboard via usb and see if it starts (I will probably use a power bank in that case to avoid burning USB (worse case scenario)). Then you can use cura ...


3

The Anet A8 uses a simple LCD with 5 buttons, the problem is that the buttons do not use digital pin signals, instead analog pins are used. Based on the pressed button, with corresponding resistance the firmware knows which button is pressed. The RAMPS smart adapter uses digital pins, so the Anet LCD is not compatible with the smart adapter, you may wan't to ...


3

Mains electric specialist here. When working in mains power, mechanical execution of work is everything. The first rule is do not casually mess around with mains power -- it will kill you! If you've done a lot of low-voltage tinkering with jury-rigged wires splayed all over the place -- do not do that with mains wiring. Ever. Break that habit with mains! ...


3

It's somewhat unclear what you mean by "standard PC cable", but virtually all desktop computers use IEC C14 sockets/IEC C13 plugs. Such connectors/sockets are rated for 10A 250V and thus you can safely assume that the cord itself will also be able to handle this voltage and current. 10A is what is specified by the IEC, certain North American standards ...


3

The block on the supply will accept the bare wire you could use the yellow in the middle on the right, but the screw on the block essentially does its own crimp.


3

Heater polarity doesn't matter The heater cartridges are just large resistors and so polarity is irrelevant. Either can be positive or negative. You can extend the leads by cutting and splicing in ~20 gauge wires* to a two pin JST connector line you suggest. *At 24 volts and 30 watts, you need wire that is rated to carry at least 1.25 amps. The US National ...


2

The power supply that you posted is 12v 360w. This means that (in the USA with 120v power), it will draw 3 amps at 120v. Your switch is rated for 10A at 250V so it works. The switch should be placed to interrupt the HOT wire coming from the wall to your power supply. If you happen to be using 240v power, it is also safe as you would be drawing 1.5 amps ...


2

At 250V a rating for 10A means 2500 Watts, which is fairly enough to use with a typical 3D printer. Make sure that the wire you use to connect the switch to the power supply can also take the current you need. Easiest way to get a cable that is safe to use is salvaging a mains cable from other devices. I would not use wires that were made for low power use ...


2

X-axis is right-to-left (Carriage motor) Y-axis is front-to-back (Base/Bed motor) Z-axis is up-and-down (lead screws) There are several videos on YouTube. This playlist seems good.


2

I've had great luck with "G16 aviation connectors" -- easy to find with a Web search, and they come in any number of pins from 2-10 (the 10s are a little harder to find). Round (so easy to panel-mount), metal barrels, locking ring so they don't come loose. If you get ones with a couple extra pins, you can double up on pins without having to double up on ...


2

After testing my z-min endstop pins, I found out that I could trigger the probe manually by using a jumper wire between Signal and Ground. I then used a NPN MOSFET to connect the sensor to the endstop by connecting the black wire of the probe to the base, the signal wire of the endstop pins to the collector, and the blue wire from the probe and the ground ...


2

Regardless of how the voltage is lowered, you aren't delivering the power to the heating elements that they are designed to deliver. For a resistive heater, the power scales with the square of the voltage. Delivering 11.4 V to the heaters will result in the power being $11.4^2/12.0^2 = 0.9025$ or 90 % of the intended power. There are two things ...


2

This picture shows the correct wiring for a British 13A mains plug: The green/yellow wire must always be connected to the earth terminal (at the top of the plug). This is most important, and will prevent electrocution if something goes wrong. The brown (live) wire should be connected to the fuse, and the blue wire to the remaining terminal. It is true that,...


2

Let's look at the notes on the relay first, as these tell us what to connect the terminals to. Powered side NO/NC - Normally Open/Normally Closed lead. Which you use determines the switching behavior: open line on signal (NC) or closed line on signal (NO). Connect this to the powered component. For heater components it is best to use NO, as a failure of a ...


2

D35, D37, D17 are the pin labels on the Arduino Mega. These do not correspond to pin numbers within Marlin. I believe that D35 actually corresponds to marlin pin 49 and this is the number you should enter in your firmware. You can find the mapping in fastio_1280.h: Hardware Pin : 02 03 06 07 01 05 15 16 17 18 23 24 25 26 64 63 13 12 46 45 44 43 78 77 76 ...


2

Sounds like one end or the other in your stepper cable is not seated correctly or has shaken loose there are 4 wires if even one doesn't make proper contact you will get a shaking back and forth almost like a hard vibration. I always take a cable from one of the other steppers plug into this one move the motor with good stepper wire 10-20 mm see what ...


2

10 cm would be fine. That's the short answer, the real answer is that it depends on the UART speed and the exact conditions that you will be extending them. If you expect noise feedback from the motor coils inducing voltages into the UART lines, then perhaps they should be shorter. Keep the high current wires and the signal (UART) in separate places if ...


2

1 meter puts you far enough away from the heater than you don't need high temperature wiring to extend it. The larger the guage(e.g. 20 guage) the less resistance you will add to the heater circuit. This doesn't matter as long as you can still achieve your maximum temperature (if you can still achieve the same current without maxing out your voltage on the ...


1

I got it to work using a CNC shield. Still haven't figured out the RAMPS 1.4 board. It doesn't work using D1 and D2 inside Aux-1 because they are used in serial communication to an LCD. So every time you send a command over USB, they get clogged. I ended up using ports 4, 5, and 63 and it works perfectly (no pin mapping needed like in other answer). #...


1

As it is alternating current, why are you interested to know which is which? (I'm referring to the blue and the brown wire, the green/yellow has an obvious purpose) E.g. a CEE 7/4 plug can be flipped around in the CEE 7/3 socket. When you flip the plug (180°), the brown and the blue switch places, it is all depending on how the electrician in your home ...


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