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14

There are three main options here for Mendel style ZX gantries: One Z screw and motor, which is similar to a cantilevered design but somewhat more stable because of the opposite smooth rod Two Z screws and two motors Two Z screws and one motor, with belt synchronization of the two sides Of all of these, running two screws off one motor is clearly superior ...


10

In the diagram, they do show the wires connecting together, which is right. You can accomplish that just about any way you like, so long as you pair up the wires correctly from one motor to the other. I'm assuming both "Z" motors are the same type and have the same color-coding for their wires. If not, you'll need to figure out the correspondences first (...


10

Why is this so rare? Such kind of printers usually harder to assembles, calibrate, and maintain because 3 axes machine is a bit more complex than 2 axes. For instance, it's can be tricky to move an entire extruder among all 3 axis and some of such printer's designs may require even dedicated exruder's design like Bowden Extruders. Are there flaws in this ...


8

that the NEMA17 motor would be using 400 Steps per mm in Z. configuration_adv.h tells that the microsteps on the Z-axis motor are 16. Easy. There are 400 microsteps in a millimeter, and 16 microsteps in a full step. So, there are 400/16=25 full steps in a millimeter. So a full step is 1/25th of a millimeter, or 0.04 mm. Your layer height should be a ...


7

For some unknown reason, everywhere everybody is saying that Z stepper motors need to be connected in parallel... And this was always the only obvious way, until recently some people started to connect these motors in series. And I personally started to believe the right way is to connect them in series. All stepstick drivers are some kind of current ...


7

Focussing on the questions at hand: Is it possible to use full steps? This depends on your printer board. Many boards use dip switches to select the (micro) stepping mode of the stepper driver. E.g. a RUMBA board has dip switches located underneath the stepper driver boards (e.g. DRV8825 or A4988). Sometimes you also see jumper caps. The answer is both ...


7

As a frame challenge, they kind of are. It's just that the optimal, and in some sense only reasonable, design for a fixed build platform that doesn't move on any axis is the delta robot geometry. This design is not the most popular, but it's far from obscure - there are lots of cheap entry-level delta printers available as well as higher-end ones. What makes ...


6

I assume you did everything according to the instructions but here is a checklist of what could be possibly wrong: Friction - check if you can rotate/move parts without lot of resistance Screws - check if screws on couplings are tight and they don't slide over a shaft or thread Stepsticks - check if they are cooled properly and similar (as there are two of ...


6

All the Prusa-based designs I've seen have only one end stop. While you are correct that it's theoretically possible for the two Z-drives to get out of sync, it's very unlikely in practice (barring serious friction, binding, etc.). But even if it happens, remember that the endstop microswitch is only used to keep the extruder assembly from crashing into ...


6

Generally, Z-axis zero is when the hot end and the build plate are close to each other. Some printers keep the hot end up at the top, and bring the build plate up to reach it. Other printers keep the build plate at the bottom, and lower the hot end down to reach it. As such, "Z axis zero" doesn't specify top or bottom of the physical printer, it just ...


6

Hmmmm In my experience when a printer has that bad of wobble it is still the Z axis. Your rods might be good, but are the two Z axis the exact correct distance and equal distance on the printer frame? Imagine that you had one a few millimeters too far out. How might the rods act? Mayhaps, over the course of several layers, they would slowly drift back and ...


6

My question is a ball screw of pitch 4mm or 5mm, will it be able to Maintain it's position when motor is deenergized under a load of 15 kg shared by two systems. The detent torque of a typical NEMA 23 stepper varies between around 3 and 7 N·cm. This is the torque produced when the windings are not energized. Using this leadscrew torque calculator, you can ...


6

Limiter Switch/Endstop That is the lever that is meant to trigger your Z-Endstop. The variant used in your case is on the cheaper end and is meant to look similar to this QIAOH KN12-1 limit switch: You will either exchange the endstop as a whole, somehow reattach the/a lever or change the physical position of the endstop so that the moving X-axis is ...


6

Tune -> Bed Z http://marlinfw.org/docs/features/lcd_menu.html#tune Per description in this table, this refers to the Mesh Bed Leveling process. It allows to modify all saved mesh z-offsets by the given amount. Tune -> Babystep Z http://marlinfw.org/docs/gcode/M290.html This just instructs the motor to move the given amount, once, without changing any ...


5

The simple way to do this is to use a self-locking screw pitch. Pretty much any single-start thread using a sliding nut cannot be back-driven so the load will not fall. Normal 8x8 trapezoidal thread screws will easily back-drive because of the steep pitch. Likewise, a worm drive between the motor and Z stage will hold the load. You would want to switch ...


5

First a resounding no. Not a good idea. Are you saying it works now that you have removed the smooth rod? That tells me for sure your issue was Binding. Which is a tricky problem to solve. Binding usually happens when your carriage is not level. Take a bubble leveler and verify. Another time it happens is when your Acceleration / Jerk settings are too high....


5

All modern slicers adjust the nozzle position for the first layer in accordance with your chosen layer height. You can see this in your gcode if you slice files with different layer heights. Before you add special slicer settings and offsets, if you print 0.1mm layers, the nozzle will start at Z=0.1mm, and if you print 0.3mm layers, the nozzle will start at ...


5

X stage binding like this is almost always caused by parallelism issues with the rods and/or screw. The two-rod-plus-screw arrangement is quite over-constrained and thus requires good alignment to move smoothly. Some basic troubleshooting steps: Make sure the screw is not constrained at both ends. It is very difficult to manufacture a screw that is ...


5

as long as you match the parts that is ok. The m8 rod will give you more stiffness and will be harder to bend. As the result, you will have to calibrate the steps/mm settings in the firmware.


5

I have the Anet A8, I confirm the threads are Tr8x8(p2). This is explained as "Tr" for trapezoidal thread followed by the nominal diameter in mm. The digits after the "x" denotes the lead of the screw (how much does the nut advance per revolution). The value between the brackets "p2" denotes the pitch. This means that the screw has 8 (lead) / 2 (pitch) = 4 ...


5

Prusa uses 9 marker points in the bed that are sensed with an induction sensor to determine the X, Y and Z position. Any deviation for skewness or bed level is compensated through the software. Please do note that the bed is pretty level to begin with (by design). This is precisely described here, please check the video. Note that Marlin Firmware (which is ...


5

After gaining more of an understanding of how Marlin works, I decided to look through the the pins file for the motherboard I am using "pins_ULTIMAIN_2.h". Sure enough, It had a the wrong pin number for the z stop specified. After changing that number, I gained full functionality. This is what they should be: #define X_STOP_PIN 22 #define ...


5

The soldering in the Tevo components is very low quality as I replaced/resoldered most of the end-stops. As the gantry goes down - please ensure that the cable is not pulled over (no contact) and there is contact on the edge of the acrylic and the end-stop, also the small acrylic switch holder could bend/slip a bit. Finally, the sensor connection to the ...


5

I had this same problem. I attributed it to the linear bearings which ride on the 8mm travel rods. I did two things which ultimately eliminated the issue (since I did both at the same time, I'm not sure which solved the issue, but believe it's #1 below): I replaced all of my ball type (stock) linear bearings with Igus Drylin linear bearings. I'm pretty sure ...


5

Within the realm of Cartesian machines (eg having orthogonal X, Y, Z axis) consider the sort of design you do see: the Ultimaker-like X-Y stage over a build platform which can drop. The question is then, why drop the build rather than raise the mechanism? Likely the reason is mechanical simplicity. The X-Y gantry is the part that moves around quickly and ...


4

It's probably intentional. Threaded rods are almost never perfectly straight. If the nut is rigidly coupled to the carriage, then the slightest deviation in the screw will either cause it to bind up or appear as artifacts (e.g. z-wobble) in the print. By making the nut slightly loose, it can move around a bit to compensate for wobble. See e.g. this design ...


4

It could be a hardware fault. First check, and compare, the control board connections to the motors of the three axes. You don't state it in your question but, presumably, the X and Y axes move correctly? If so, then compare the connections for the Z-axis motors with the connections for the motors of the axes that work as expected. If they are correct ...


4

I'm not a 3d printing expert by any means, but I had some funky layer stuff going on before "wrinkled" first layer & gross edges w/overlap. For my printer, the problem was I was over-extruding. I followed this video by Tom's 3D: 3D printing guides - Calibrating your extruder For some reason, I had to do it twice before it actually worked. Once I got ...


4

I have made some learning on mechanical setup and discovered some issues on my printer, there are few: Bed warped, even with glass (thin thickness), making BAL confused with Z-movement over the bed. Overextrusion making layer oversized in terms of thickness. Some of missing mechanical fine adjustments. The main reason for this symptom was the overextrusion ...


4

Alright, I have figured everything out with the help of #reprap IRC community. Issue #1 - Z axis not moving during zero. Just as tjb1 suggested the issue was that it thought it was hitting the endstop, I needed to invert the logic of the endstop within the configuration.h const bool Z_MAX_ENDSTOP_INVERTING = true; Issue #2 - No Heated bed controls. The ...


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