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Does anyone know of a (manufacturer independent) software that supports different types of SLA printers?

Since there are many different SLA type printers around, I was wondering if there are any unified or open source methods for slicing in case the manufacturer drops support for the printer software (or my OS upgrades on me overnight and breaks compatability).

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    $\begingroup$ When you say "open source", do you really mean one where you can have the source code and edit how the program behaves, or do you mean something else? $\endgroup$ – Davo Jun 30 at 11:46
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, more or less the wiki definition is what I mean; ideally I was thinking of some type of unified software or machine code that could work across most SLA type printers. Not sure if I am just over thinking this one though. $\endgroup$ – Dr. Mantis Tobbogan Jun 30 at 13:46
  • $\begingroup$ So then you don't want to edit the source code, you are just asking about a slicer that works for different makes of SLA printers - correct? $\endgroup$ – Davo Jun 30 at 17:22
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, that's correct. $\endgroup$ – Dr. Mantis Tobbogan Jun 30 at 22:15
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From what I have researched, each brand of printer has their own method of slicing objects for their printer to parse. For example:

There doesn't appear to be any golden ticket type of method (like G-Code) for slicing and providing instructions.

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    $\begingroup$ note that most SLA printers pretty much are a glorified slideshow with a little movement in between... and the trick is how they set up the firmware to do that. With the locked down firmware it is hard to make a standard protocol, thus making the slicers rather locked up. $\endgroup$ – Trish Jun 30 at 11:00
  • $\begingroup$ That makes sense I suppose, do you know if there have been any attempts or movement to have standardize firmware across manufacturers? $\endgroup$ – Dr. Mantis Tobbogan Jun 30 at 13:48
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    $\begingroup$ That is a different question, but there are several printers that use the same slicer(s), so possibly use the same firmware base or a common protocol. $\endgroup$ – Trish Jun 30 at 16:11

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