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I'm very new to 3D printing and I've had numerous failed prints. Sometimes, the print is good but while trying to get it off the base I end up bending or breaking the print.

My question is: How to I print and make it easier to release from the plate?

I'm printing with PETG, PLA and ABS. At the moment, it's PETG that is giving me trouble.

My printer is a QIDITECH Dual Extruder.

I found this:

https://all3dp.com/1/remove-3d-print-from-bed-stuck-glass/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V6fudqMEGyI

I haven't tried any of the proposed solutions yet.

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    $\begingroup$ This is a difficult question to answer on StackExchange, simply because there are too many possible answers. Really, it is a matter of opinion, and such questions are discouraged. You might be better off on Facebook Groups or Reddit, where asking for opinions is the norm (and you will get answers very quickly). Note that PETG loves to stick to PEI sheets and won't let go. The air duster might just work. $\endgroup$ – Mick Dec 16 '17 at 5:37
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    $\begingroup$ Why are you asking before trying the proposed methods? $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Dec 18 '17 at 13:03
  • $\begingroup$ I edited the post and added the new findings later....I've tried a few things, its been suggested using tap to print on, which I've ordered and will try. $\endgroup$ – SPlatten Dec 18 '17 at 13:10
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The all3dp article you linked to is very comprehensive and shows what are the "approaches" to print removal, rather than just the tools. For the sake of keeping all info accessible here, the article highlight these 6 approaches:

  • Brute force
  • Wedge the joint apart
  • Thermal difference
  • Chemical reaction
  • Mechanical cut
  • Bed warping

To that list I would add a final class of solutions that I would call "sacrificial surface": use some removable substrate like painter's tape and remove that from the bed rather than the print from it. Once the print+surface is off the printer than is normally very easy to scrape or sand the material off the print.

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I would reccomend heating up the base a bit. If your printer doesnt come with such an option, try heat-gun.

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  • $\begingroup$ The bed is heated and yes I’ve tried this. I’m hoping the tape will solve the issue. $\endgroup$ – SPlatten Dec 18 '17 at 19:24
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I am new myself and here is what helps me:

1.) Make sure your z-offset is correct, you want it to just be enough to stick, you do not want the nozzle pushing the filament into the base any harder than it has to.

2.) For pieces that are too short or otherwise shaped so as not to be able to grab and pull off easy, I generally will use a raft as I find the rafts are easier to pry off than the piece itself, even if the piece already has a large surface area exposed to the bed.

3.) Get a print removal tool if you don't have one (mine came with one). I don't have a glass bed but would likely want to be careful here. It's basically a metal spatula. These can be purchased on amazon under 3d printing accessories..

I know some other people will use Kapton tape or magigoo which are available on Amazon. I'm NOT CERTAIN that these are to help with removal (magigoo says its an adhesive that's designed to release the print after its cooled). Kapton tape I'm just speculating as I see it advertised everywhere for 3d printing, so I would research further on these.

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In the end I found using the tape was a great help, getting the level correct is also a big help.

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I use multiple layers of Elmer's white glue on the glass bed (five layers I think). The glue is PVA which provides a textured surface onto which the PETG adheres. It sticks better when the bed is hot than when the bed is cold. I use a bed temp of 58 degrees on my Anet A8. I have found out that the temp reported by the Anet is lower than the temperature that I measured the surface of the glass to be with my temperature probe. The PETG removes some of the layers of PVA when it comes off. For this reason I'm constantly needing to add more glue to the area that was printed, until the surface is so uneven that I have to remove the glass plate, clean it and start over again. If you take this advice, never flip the glass plate over onto the bare aluminum with the glue on it, as it will stick very firmly!

My colleague in work who has the same Anet A8 uses a glue stick in place of white glue. He also has a good experience printing PETG in this manner. I have tried his glue stick method, and found it difficult to clean when it's time to clean the glass. Now I live by my white glue method.

To apply the glue I use a foam artist's brush to make the layer nice and even. I let each layer dry before I apply the subsequent layers. After each use I quickly wash the brush because the glue will harden in the foam and cause the brush to wear out.

I also use this method with PLA, and TPU.

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  • $\begingroup$ PID-tune your Heatbed $\endgroup$ – Trish Sep 6 '18 at 5:54

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