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The Y-axis belt just broke on my Ender 3 v2. I believe that it was over tensioned from the factory. When I initially assembled the printer, I noticed that the Y-axis tensioner was tightened almost all the way. The belt itself felt very stiff. The X-axis belt, which I installed upon assembly, didn't require a lot of tightening. I have ordered replacement belt material and clips to make new belts.

What is the proper tension for both the X- and Y-axis belts?

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  • $\begingroup$ they should have a little sound when pulled at. $\endgroup$
    – Trish
    Jan 7 at 23:58
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Generally, a timing belt is a complicated device and many things depend on its internal construction and materials (it may be damaged when bound in wrong direction, or when cut, and when overtighten of course, etc.). There is also physics and math applicable, based on Mersenne's laws.

Some vendors provide calculators (online or as phone apps), which can calculate tension (force in Newtons or lbs) or the frequency (Hz). Therefore often the advice is to tension the belt until some (bass) sound is present - and professionals would tune belts with a sound tuner. There are also hints that belts should be possible to connect with fingers with slight or significant pressure (so not consistent). There is also visual guideline: when you slowly move the carriage with hand, the belt should remain straight. (Slowly, because belt is elastic and may behave different when moving carriage stronger and faster against friction of pulley.)

I would suggest to read this article on 3dprintingspot.com for many practical suggestions.

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Mine came from the factory tight enough that it doesn't sag at all, but not so tight that it feels hard or stiff or difficult to deflect a bit with gentle pressure. With the bed pushed all the way to the back, I can push the y-axis belt to the side about 1/8" with gentle pressure, and it feels like that's about as far as it's going to go even if I were to push harder. Seems to work really well without a lot of unnecessary force.

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