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14

If you'd like to print on RepRap like FDM printers, you cannot print from metal, but you can use some filament that tries to look like metal. I have good experience with Bronzefill, but there are plenty of others, just Google for metal filament 3d printing. Note that sometimes the parts need to be post-processed with a rock tumbler. There are several open ...


8

Especially for smaller parts, I would suggest looking into electroplating. You can get a really nice, copper, nickel, or even gold finish using it. The biggest issue is that to electroplate something, it must be conductive, but there are many conductive paints on the market which you can use to apply a very light coating to make the plastic conductive. I ...


8

The Colorfabb metal filaments are the most metal-like filaments I've used (copper, brass, and bronze) and probably the ones that would make the most sense for jewelry. While not as dense as solid metal, it's about 3 times as dense as regular plastic and when polished the metal shows through. Print at 100% infill to make it heavier. Bronzefill is about 3.9g/...


7

One good option would be to - if possible - change the design, so the nut is inserted from the opposite side, so that the bolt just pulls it in tighter rather than pulling it out. Another option would be to instead of using a nut, use a brass threaded insert. These are like nuts, except they have ridges that are specifically aimed at locking it inside the ...


6

The particles on the outmost part of the print which are exposed to air will rust. The ones inside will still be protected somewhat by the PLA. The rust color/effect is part of the idea, since it give certain prints an old look. https://www.proto-pasta.com/products/magnetic-iron-pla


6

If you use filaments filled with metal particles, some particles will be exposed to the environment. Depending on the corrosion resistance of those metals, yes the environmental conditions will weather the print object. So if it contains iron (and does not contain elements that prevent oxidation like used in stainless steel) and it is subjected to water and ...


6

If the outside of the bushing will bond well to the epoxy, your method is simple and likely to be effective. You could use the same method used for threaded inserts by roughing the exterior of the bushing, heating it and forcing it into a correctly sized hole printed in the model. The threaded inserts are knurled or otherwise textured to provide stronger ...


6

A few things are required for effective extrusion-style 3d printing materials: It must stay where placed by the nozzle long enough to harden (or, alternately for pastes and such, have a shear-thinning or thixotropic viscous profile so it will not flow under its own weight). If using a filament extruder, it must have a wide range of viscosity that varies ...


5

I think the closest you're going to get is with a composite material. Over the last 2 years or so, there have been more and more composite filaments emerging on the market for consumer 3D printers. I good example of composite filaments can be seen on Proto-Pasta. Since the filament must mostly be comprised of the polymer "binder", the material will obviously ...


5

I"m no expert on this, but the article at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amorphous_metal may be relevant for you. There are some special alloys, such as gold/silicon and various titanium-based ones, that become "bulk metal glasses" if cooled extremely quickly (for example, by sputtering onto a spinning cold surface). The speed of cooling prevents crystal ...


5

The jewelry industry typically uses printers that print in wax, and transform the models into precious metal by lost wax casting. Statasys offers wax printing in their Solidscape line, 3D systems offers ProJet. With this process there is basically no waste, since you can remelt the casting sprues. I am not aware of printers that print directly in precious ...


4

Let's preface, that there are a LOT of metal identification methods. For example, I found this guide helpful and I had been at the scrapyard lately, where I have been told that 90+% of the time, steel objects that are non-magnetic are the more valuable stainless steels. The kitchen sink I dropped off? Stainless, non-magnetic steel. Tempering/Annealing ...


4

You have several options: Printing with filaments made up of plastic and metal powder mix. Bronzefill is one example. While most may argue it doesn't look much like bronze or copper and rather clay, it can made to by some automatic polishing methods: How to polish copperFill & bronzeFill filament Polishing 3D Printed Bronze w/ Rock Tumbler & Steel ...


4

I spent some time looking at making an FDM machine that would print bronze filament. An alloy commonly made into wire had a difference between the solidus and liquidus temperature of only 50 degrees C. I determined that one could make a conventional hot end, electrically heated, made of either molybdenum or tungsten. I did not determine how the bronze ...


4

parts ... I don't want to ... feel like a plastic This is harder than looking like metal. Plastic doesn't have nearly the density of metal, nor the thermal conductivity of metal. So by touch people will be able to tell the difference between almost any metal item, and a plastic item that looks similar. For jewelry, as long as the wearer doesn't mind that ...


3

In addition to the aforementioned enriched filaments which give an excellent result, ABS can be plastered, painted and even chrome plated.


3

Instead of super glue, you could try a two part epoxy resin (any brand should do, i.e. Bison Kombi Power or JB Weld). This may take longer to dry, than the super glue, but should be much stronger, and deal with torsion forces better1. Or, you could try red (not blue) Loctite. However, the epoxy resin would probably be stronger. 1 This is admittedly an ...


2

According to our materials experts, you should always be careful interpreting the start of the force-displacement diagram. It is possible that the test needs to "set" itself, important issues are: the clamping of the test articles in the test bench vices alignment of the test article in the test bench size of the test articles (the load suggests small test ...


2

Stainless steel is created by adding elements (usually Chromium, but also Nickel) to steel. These added elements form an oxide layer with the outside air protecting the steel from corroding. Whether stainless steel is magnetic or not depends on the added elements and the micro structure of the steel; some are and some aren't magnetic. From physlink: As ...


2

Just heat the nut with a soldering iron to seat it into place (after the print). I've done this many times myself. EDIT: Try a bit of acetone, to allow the ABS near the nut to reflow.


1

There's also an interesting discussion of printing with specially-designed solder alloys, at RepRap: Blog - A new approach to printing metals. The author settled on 57.5%Sn, 41.3%Bi, 1.2% In, which begins to melt at 130 °C and finishes by about 170 °C. This has much better viscosity after melting, so it doesn't just drip away or bead up, and ...


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