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5

Oscar's answer is the correct solution to this issue. My printer was printing skewed and there is a built in correction for this in Marlin. Unfortunately the X5S does not have a boot loader and I don't have an ISP programmer (yet), so I am unable to re-flash my board at the moment. In the mean time I created a software fix for this issue. I used a script to ...


4

Indeed, even belt tension is important, what helped me enormously to set the same tension in the belts on my self build CoreXY is a tool like this: Furthermore, be sure that you do not have any binding on the Y carriages over the whole range. This causes inaccurate printing, e.g. outer walls not adhering to the inner walls (as I encountered myself in the ...


4

For a CoreXY printer to move an axis (X or Y) it requires both stepper motors to turn. If both turn the same direction (at the same speed with the same pulleys), the X-axis will move, if they rotate both in a different direction (at the same speed with the same pulleys) the Y axis will move (see image of CoreXY kinematics below). Rotation of a single stepper ...


3

I had the same issue with my X5S when I first got it assembled. Because it's CoreXY, if one pulley slips, you'll skip steps in the diagonal. Check both set screws on your pulleys for the X and Y.


2

Use a servo. This way you can use the digital pins to control it; or in your specific case PWM_PC9 Connect it to the expansion port and configure one of the digital pins in the marlin configuration file. A servo will go to the minimum position when the pin goes low, and the max position when the pin goes high. I take it you don't need any stops in between ...


2

The CoreXY kinematics can be seen as an evolution of the H-bot kinematics. In Marlin, you both need to configure the printer as a CoreXY machine. Note that your steps are determined by the pulleys in the steppers and need to be the same for the steppers. With testing you will find out if you have the correct value. There are many popular designs out there; e....


2

The tradeoffs in these systems are all about quality achievable at particular speed and acceleration profiles. If you really don't care about speed at all and want maximum accuracy, you probably want some type of Cartesian setup with no belts, only rigid lead screws which you can take to as fine a pitch as you like, and you can make all the parts as rigid as ...


1

Every time I.m will go to print, if turn off the machine, the process to be need repeat, in other words, the gcode M500 doesn't work. This tells me that your firmware has the EEPROM support needed for the M500 command disabled. Fixing the firmware You need to update your firmware to enable storing the information in the EEPROM: the line should read as ...


1

No The tension should be equal to allow equal force pulling the carriage. If uneven, this may lead to incorrect/skew prints or binding of linear bearings (from experience). A typical layout of the mechanism is shown below. Note that there are several solutions for placing the belts; they can be in the same plane (where the belts cross in the back, as ...


1

LS1 & 2 are considered for the X-axis Yes, these correspond to X-max and X-min, respectfully. LS3 & 4 are for the Y-axis Yes, these correspond to Y-min and Y-max, respectfully. do I need all of these switches? Technically, no, you need one switch for each axis (if homing is used), but it can be saving your printer when somehow a layer shift has ...


1

After many hours tinkering, pulling things apart, testing them and re-assembling them, it turned out that the problem was a broken wire for the X_Min endstop. This has now been replaced and the problem is resolved.


1

Shifts in a diagonal direction in CoreXY indicate loss of synch between the two belts. If it's the belt very loose skipping, you may not hear much but such a loose belt is easy to notice. If it's the belt a bit loose skipping, you would hear relatively loud noises which make very clear what's happening. If there are no particular noises, it's the motor ...


1

Using rails for Z is overkill. They are stiffer than smooth rods, but for Z axis that's not needed. Using only the leadscrew may be enough, especially in designs with three of them, but if you have only two you may be able to still twist the bed around the Z axis. Also, the bed would be supported only in the center by the "nut" on the leadscrew. ...


1

CoreXY should not require calculations which can slow down a board. Also, a normal Marlin becomes CPU limited often before 100 mm/s on 8 bit boards due to arc interpolation and other processing. However, if you use Klipper which runs on a Raspberry Pi, 8 bit boards are rarely a limiting factor. I could print at 100 mm/s on mine with only 30% CPU utilisation ...


1

You can use an 8-bit controller board for a CoreXY kinematics 3D printer. The calculations are not so complicated opposed to those for a Delta. My Hypercube Evolution uses a RUMBA controller board that hasn't failed me past years.


1

Just to clarify: Examples of kinematic systems would be Cartesian (which includes CoreXY), Delta, Scara, and Six-Axis. The quality of the system has less to do with the system and more to do with the implementation. Furthermore, there are 2 main types of desktop/benchtop 3d printers that are commonly available: Fused Deposition Modelling (or fused filament ...


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