14

The following is a compilation of the input from a number of sources. Linear rails in general are mechanical components that - when designing equipment - offer great flexibility. The profile of the rail can be designed in nearly infinite ways. This in turn allows for: Different levels of stiffness in different directions (for example you may have stresses ...


7

Don't use grease, it is better to use a light oil to lubricate the rods. A light oil will help flush out any dust and filament debris, grease will trap it. I've used both light machine oil (like used for sewing machines) and PTFE based spray (Teflon). Grease is thick and will collect and trap dust and particles more easily than light machine oil. Even ...


7

It's a question of what you want to use the belt for. All Belts are subject to stress as they run around the motor and idlers and gears and bend. They will get eaten as they are subject to friction against parts, they will stretch as they are subject to tension. All this applies some sort of stress or another on the belt. Anything that is subject to stress ...


5

Belts come in several formulations. This page from McMaster-Carr lists several types of belts. The main materials (rubbers) are Neoprene and urethane, with fiberglass, Kevlar, and steel reinforcement. I would suggest spending some time looking at these, comparing the specs, and basing your choice on the needs of your application. I used 1/4" wide MXL ...


5

The question is if robots classification terminology the textbook sketches applies to 3D printing? Servos (closed loop) are used in robots to guarantee position (you don't want to accumulate an error after repetitive movement), most 3D printers use open loop steppers that are instructed on a point to point basis through G-code instructions, implying that ...


4

Each printer will have different "print in place" tolerances, but you can find such a model with which to determine the numbers you seek. One such item is on Thingiverse:


4

The answer is yes; and it's a normal thing to do. https://www.igus.com/info/linear-guides-butting-rails-together Basically you should only do it with rails from the same manufacturer and you might have to file the mating surfaces, but butting them is altogether trivial. This method works with Drylin and UHMW-PE bearing surfaces as recirculating balls could ...


4

I used a few different linear rail systems in my build: plain smooth rods for Z motion smooth rods bonded to a T-haped steel base for a 1200mm Y axis (similar to those at https://cdn.automationdirect.com/static/specs/suremotionlinear.pdf) igus "low profile linear slide" for X (https://www.igus.com/drylin/profile-rail-guide) They all seem to work pretty ...


2

This seems to be either a case of either belt slop or missed steps or it is a case of the accuracy of the limit switch. If the limit switch moves even a little into either direction, you have to account twice that as the maximum error. So the 4 mm error could come from 2 mm into either direction from the 0-position. However, there is a silver lining: ...


2

I have recently changed the standard belts on my Prusa MK3 for the aramid fiber reinforced E3D neoprene belts. Those belts are really tough and hard to cut even with a quality side cutter! They have a much smoother surface and a lot more aramid fibers than the standard belts. Prior to the change, the belt on the X axis was twisting when changing directions, ...


2

Difficult to say with the given data, but here are a couple of ideas: First theory: The belt is too thin/flexible for the linear guide. Linear guides remove the backslash by adding quite some pressure in the ball system: The block is slightly too small (compared to the rail) and thus it compress the balls and rail. The backslash is avoided until you reach ...


2

I'm can't say for sure, since this is my first time seeing this type of 3D printer configuration too, but I think this is a cartesian style printer. If you think about it, it is similar to a Prusa-style printer, but instead of an x-gantry being raised and lowered by a leadscrew, the heated bed is being lowered and raised with two leadscrews. Software-wise, ...


1

If the x-axis rods only move in the x axis then there’s no problem, but if they aren’t firmly secured in the other axes then there could be issues. If they’re able to move then presumably they aren’t secured that well. Given the relatively small forces involved in 3D printing though, you may well be fine.


1

Upon further research these defined classes of control (from a robotics perspective) only apply to servo motors. At the highest level the methods of control being categorised as: Servo Non-Servo The three categories I listed in my question are all subsets of the Servo category and rely upon feedback from the servo.


1

3D Printers fall under additive manufacturing and then can be classified by the material first. Usually, the material dictates entirely what the design looks like and it would be foolish to not differentiate what you look at by this first. For some materials, there are a couple of subtypes that tell us about which method for fusing the material is used, but ...


1

At the limit, precision is limited by the achievable positioning accuracy of the motors and the mechanical reflection of that precision into a linear position. With a belt drive, the mechanical precision for a stepper-motor system is the circumference of the drive pulley divided by the number of distinct step positions. A 1.5 degree stepper with 10::1 ...


1

In many years of building printers I only used ball screws for the Z-axis, and even then only for larger Makerbot and Ultimaker style designs that had a heavy platform. Even for the Z-axis, a good thick trapezoid screw with the right anti-backlash configuration is often enough because most printers are light and most slicers only print upwards. Modern belts ...


1

Linear actuator would be the proper name for the mechanism driving the movement along a single axis. There are 2 linear actuators driving the X-axis platform (for a Prusa i3 Cartesian printer, or the build platform for a raising bed Cartesian printer like a CoreXY, H-bot, etc.), the collection of parts could be named the Z-axis assembly.


1

I do not believe the standard rubber/plastic belts have any significant stretching over time, nor do they stretch under drive motor force during acceleration (and in any case, extrusion takes place mostly under steady-velocity conditions). While I suppose it's possible a steel-reinforced belt might have a longer lifetime, replacing a belt is quick and cheap, ...


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