4

First, find or make a tolerance checking test print. This basically just involves a few cylinders with diameters something like 0.1, 0.15, 0.2, 0.25, 0.3, ... mm smaller than a cylindrical hole, and lets you figure out what works without going through lots of iterations on your actual part design or time on the printer. Make note that diameter (2 gaps) vs ...


4

You shouldn't calibrate the steps/mm for the X, Y, and Z axes. Just use the default settings which are based on the theoretical values for the given belts/leadscrews/threaded rods. The mistake is in assuming that the error in the dimensions of the 20x20x20 calibration cube are purely due to the steps/mm setting. Due to a variety of reasons (inconsistent ...


3

Dimensional accuracy is not as important as dimensional uniformity. I can print with undersized (or oversized) filament, adjusting the flow appropriately, provided the filament has a consistent diameter. When creating filament in-house, without expensive equipment, it is difficult to maintain the same diameter throughout the entire extrusion. It is likely ...


3

If the amount of time spent by the head near the corner is significantly longer than what's spent per unit time elsewhere, you will get more extrusion at the corners and thus this effect. High print speed combined with low acceleration/jerk limits give you this effect. Using a lower print speed should make it go away because it takes very little time to ...


3

Slicers will round off to the next nearest layer, so 20.2 mm in your case. However, you can get to 20.1 mm if you use a 0.3 mm first layer.


2

With most filaments you don't need to do anything special to account for overfill caused by these crossing points. When the nozzle extrudes the second direction, it pushes the lines laid by the first direction out of the way. The same happens when the third direction crosses the first two. There's a blob, but it's a blob within the plane of the layer, so it ...


2

Put it simply: they say 1.75 mm with a ± error of 0.05 mm. Which means your flow may vary ±2.9 % while you are printing creating blobs and such. The smaller the filament tolerance, the more expensive the production costs.


2

In the world of hobbyist milling machines, a DRO accessory is extremely valuable for improving work flow and accuracy of project builds. The Digital Read Out devices run the gamut from affordable to astonishingly expensive and cover one, two and three axis readouts. For single axis purposes, some hobbyists will simply find a means to attach a digital caliper,...


2

Besides offsetting the clearances you want into models, you can and should also calibrate your printer to compensate for included holes - because often inner holes are solved to be smaller than actually designed out of necessity. However, the option can also be used to fix problems that stem from the slicing and printing itself, and thus offers to fix some ...


1

This seems like a tolerance press fit problem and similar to what you will find if you try the same using normal machining operations on a lathe or milling machine. I print 3 mm clearance fit holes on my Prusa MK3S, meant to fit on 3.00 mm (measured with a digital caliper) stainless steel shafts. The printed parts are from Fusion 360 models, with 3 mm holes ...


1

There are 3 effects at work, and you misread your micrometer: the measurement is 19.35 in the picture. You have a little lip There's a little lip at the top and bottom of the print. You'd need to clean that up with a sharp knife or sandpaper. That is the biggest part of the error you measure. Movement errors accumulate Errors also collect on the center of ...


1

If an axis doesn't print the sizes you command it there are basically 2 options causing this. The printer is incorrectly configured, The printer has an hardware issue. To find out which of the 2 is applicable, you need to look into your setup and into the firmware settings. E.g. from the printers display you can read the amount of steps the stepper needs ...


1

This looks like a shift rather than a twist. Looking closely at the "+" opening, it doesn't look as much twisted as it looks as if the top and bottom halves are sheared, with the top half shifted slightly right and the bottom shifted slightly left. The horizontal part of the plus seems aligned on the left and right halves. When you press-fit the keycaps, ...


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