4

If you carbonize the filament or other particles that are clogging the nozzle, then you will never get them clean. In my experience, it's not worth cleaning the nozzle with anything other than cleaning filament. If that doesn't work then change the nozzle. Heating the metal nozzle with a torch will change the temper of the material. I used to try cleaning ...


4

Isopropyl alcohol (IPA) is the general recommendation I've heard and it works well for me.


4

Your best fix is to get a replacement nozzle. Nozzles are relatively cheap. Having and replacing them on a regular basis is a good thing. Replacement can help you maintain proper printing. You can probably get the cleaning tool out of the old nozzle, but most likely you'll damage it further, making it nearly useless.


3

I would personally stick to isopropanol. Be aware that 3D printing is a very expensive hobby, but health wise this is a better option. Methylated spirits can quickly become dangerous, and often can burn with a close to invisible flame, meaning that you may not even see if it is burning. Also, the fumes can quickly become dangerous, whereas after years of ...


2

There is a huge difference between "Certified food -safe" and "is actually perfectly safe for you to use at home" . – Carl Witthoft Sep 18 '18 at 14:54 Regarding certified food safe I point to Ender 3 is capable of food safe printing? - you probably can't get the certification with a 3D printer, but, as Carl said, you might manage a pretty safe at home. So ...


2

For BuildTak, my first recommendation is isopropyl alcohol (aka rubbing alcohol or isopropanol). Readily available just about anywhere basic medical supplies are sold, it cuts though light oils and greases, and dissolves most common build surface adhesives like hairspray or Elmer's glue stick. In fact I often give my Ender's bed a light spray of isopropyl ...


2

Ethanol (Ethyl Alcohol) should work just fine as long as it's around 80% or more. It's very similar to isopropanol as a cleaning solvent. What you're basically doing is removing any stray grease from the bed with a solvent that evaporates quickly. Methanol would also probably work. It's very poisonous though, and shouldn't come into contact with your skin, ...


1

I have encountered this many times. This is how I solved it: Sadly you have to disassemble the entire hotend. Remove the nozzle, remove the heatbreak and heatsink leaving the heater block in place, it does not need to be cleaned (unless I am mistaken). If there are any plastic pieces in those parts, remove them as well. Now for the cleaning. Use hot air gun ...


1

The IPA with the resin in it is a chemical waste and toxic to nature. As such, it needs to be given to a chemical waste handler. But those handlers do charge by volume, so you need to find a way to handle volumes reasonably. On the one hand, this means to not use huge volumes for washing the prints but reasonably small batches, and on the other hand to try ...


1

Dish soap will remove grease very well. Once you rinse it with a moist sponge and dry with a clean cloth most residues will be gone.


1

Besides IPA (80 %), which is one of the best cleaners for general pourpose, 99 % ethanol ("Spiritus") can work as a good substitute. Acetone too can be used on BuildTak and its clones in a pitch without damaging it, as long as it is kept away from the edges, where it could weaken the bond to the aluminium. Using it repeatedly could however smooth the ...


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