8

PLA absorbs moisture, so keeping the filament dry is a key factor. Aside from that, PLA is naturally more brittle than other plastics like ABS and Nylon Sorry, tried to find a graph to prove it, but couldn't find one. There's a good Google Group discussion and many other resources that go over good storage habits, but as for fixing the existing filament. ...


7

The primary issue with long-term exposure of filament to the environment is that it will absorb water moisture from the air. When a filament that has absorbed water is passing though the hot end of a printer, the water will turn to steam and cause problems with extrusion: Small bubbles of steam can form, causing extrusion to sputter - you might hear a ...


6

Increase nozzle temperature. When the filament is new it will print easier, requiring less heat to print well. So if you didn't store your filament properly to begin with, increasing print temperature will make it jam less and increase layer bonding. The reason for this is because the moisture that accumulates in the filament will absorb heat and evaporate ...


5

Mine is more of an educated guess than a definitive diagnosis, but it looks to me like if your printer may be overextruding (it's difficult to say with certainty with this particular picture, but your top layers too do not look as good as they should). I wonder if you have calibrated your extrusion for this particular spool of filament? This is something ...


5

It's totally possible to achieve but the result vastly depends on your painting skills and your spray paint quality. Your can look at this page for a concrete example. How it compares to stone filament is fairly subjective though. Painting a 3D print usually breaks down in 3 steps : Smoothing out the lines. Achieved by either sanding the print or ...


5

Sorry to say it, but MOST wrap-unders are caused by end-users releasing the free end of the filament when handling the spool. It is mathematically impossible to introduce a knot during initial spooling, and all the reputable filament vendors these days have pretty careful free-end control when the spool is taken off the spooler and sent to packaging. Where ...


4

Filament should come off of the roll without overlapping itself. That being said depending on what you paid for it would determine if you should complain. Normally you get what you pay for. If you paid \$10 for it, I would think that is why it was so cheap, but if you paid >\$25 it should be nice stuff.


4

I am only going to answer the part of the question about how to improve the results from low-quality filament: There have already been projects going on dealing with the issue of varying filament diameter. A sensor that detects the filament's diameter and sends its value to the printers firmware can compensate for the varying volume of the filament pushed ...


4

Moisture creeps into the filament when PLA is exposed for a long time to a humid environment. This is audible like popping bubbles when heated in the hotend and does worsen the print quality. The moisture causes a noticeable property as it breaks the long molecular chains of the thermoplastic material. Once this has happened, its effect is irreversible. ...


4

In theory, most filaments don't go bad. It is however always a good idea to store filament dry. To enforce this, some use racks in a well-heated room, others are blessed with very dry weather overall. And others are forced to use dryboxes. Dryboxes can keep the filament reasonably isolated from the surrounding air and so prevent moisture interacting with ...


3

That's a filament cleaner/oiler combo. The black bottle is a variety of machine oil. The effect of oilers on prints is heavily disputed in the community. The suggestion of plant oils is a very bad one as they can create residue that stays in the hotend and create clogs.


3

When water gets absorbed into the filament, it causes some of the long chain polymers to break. This is a permanent reaction that cannot be fixed by baking the filament, which typically results in the embrittlement of the material. This is true for both the filament and the printed part.


3

PLA seems to become brittle with age. Micro-fractures develop on the surface, and they will grow if filament is taken off the spool and held straight. This behaviour does not seem to be linked to moisture content. The best course of action is probably to use PLA quickly. Don't give it time to age.


3

First of all, thanks for all the help, it really is a nice community! But none of them actually helped and I finally find out what to actually do to fix the problem so here it goes: Extruder temperature didn't change anything (made it worse under 190°C/374°F) Speed didn't change anything (tried as low as 10mm/s) Z tuning didn't change anything Using 0.3mm ...


3

So, low-teck, old-style investigative work from my side.... I contacted a company selling HDPLA and they got back to me with the following reply. We created HDPLA as an industrial PLA with special additives. As a result, our so called HDPLA has the advantages of ABS, but prints as easy as regular PLA. HDPLA has high impact, high strength and high heat ...


3

I think you will find that it will be necessary for you to tune your own printer to a specific resin. Even as important, you would expect to have different parameters for different colors of resin, as each will absorb the UV to a different degree. You haven't provided parameters in your request for which resin to use. You will consider availability and cost ...


3

Dimensional accuracy is not as important as dimensional uniformity. I can print with undersized (or oversized) filament, adjusting the flow appropriately, provided the filament has a consistent diameter. When creating filament in-house, without expensive equipment, it is difficult to maintain the same diameter throughout the entire extrusion. It is likely ...


2

Filament manufacturers (for example, Colorfabb) also sell pellets, price per kilo would be about 10 times less than the same plastic in filament form. Out of household garbage only ABS can be easily extruded into filament with Filabot-grade machine. PET AKA plastic bottles looks promising as well. You can also use certain products "off-label". For example, ...


2

Bubbles are a defect. Two problems can occur: The air in the bubble will be under pressure when heated and can cause a little blow-out when the plastic sides of the bubble are soft enough that they can no longer contain the pressure. Depending on where this happens, it can either result in little spatters of filament being spit through the nozzle at the ...


2

Put it simply: they say 1.75 mm with a ± error of 0.05 mm. Which means your flow may vary ±2.9 % while you are printing creating blobs and such. The smaller the filament tolerance, the more expensive the production costs.


2

Turns out the filament was the problem, I tried printing a model with a high quality sample PLA filament I had and it printed perfectly; one of the cleanest prints I've had. Never skimp on filament.


2

I won't even ask why you need this and I assume you've done your homework about the issues. 3D printed gears are notorious for failing even when designed well, so the idea in general should be pretty doable. TPU would be a terrible choice for a number of reasons. It's flexible which would make it a bad gear to begin with, but it is also very very tough. So ...


2

deliberate/planned obsolescence is the term you look for If you design parts that break after some time, you plan their obsolescence. That you do by a deliberate choice of material and working conditions. Designing a part that will break after a certain time can be done by choosing the correct stresses that will make your chosen material break. In a gear ...


1

PLA snapping is pretty universal. The best countermeasure is to always remove the filament from the printer after a print and place it in a low-humidity chamber. Other answers speak of moisture-induced micro-cracks, for which I have no evidence for or against. This has occurred for me when I've been lazy about putting filament away after a print. I've ...


1

Your heading is about how brittle the material is, but the question is asking about layer adhesion. I'll go ahead and tackle the layer adhesion portion. There are many variables at play here but unless you are using two filaments fresh out of the box, I would guess moisture might be the issue. Moisture The filaments pick up moisture as they are left out or ...


1

Not inherently. There are two things at work that might cause one color to test weaker than others even as its properties otherwise are functionally identical: A bad print among good ones. A bad roll among good ones. Let's take a look at both, then do a little excursus into plastics and color. A bad print There are probably thousands of reasons a print ...


1

The answer is that it depends on the climate you are in or the climate in your house. The more humid, the faster the moisture is taken up in the filament. I have obtained a spool of filament that has been left in the garage for a few months, this spool has taken up so much moisture that it has become very brittle (unspooling will break the filament). Note ...


1

If you don't want to use silica beads, or can't get any (it seems to be a very American thing, you can't buy any here in France except if you go through a specialized reseller), you can put them in a sealable plastic box with one of those big desiccants for rooms. That's what I use for my Nylon and PVA from Ultimaker and it works like a charm. It keeps ...


1

This has been sitting for a long time without an answer, so let me answer with an experience I've had with PETG rather than HIPS. PETG seems to be a relatively soft plastic. It isn't soft like TPU, but it is softer than PLA or ABS. The HIPS filament (which I have but haven't used) appears to also be softer, so it is possible that my PETG problem could ...


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